Millard’s Crossing

Millard’s Crossing is a Historical Village with beautifully,  reconstructed historic homes. Established by the late Lera Millard Thomas, the village is a collection of charming Victorian Cottages and Cabins. Also included is a one room school house, a Log  Office, General Store, an Old Farmhouse and a Wood Workers Shop. All of the homes and such were moved from their original site to this walk through museum of History. Mrs. Thomas has an eclectic collection of antiques which are beautifully displayed inside each structure.

Also at the museum is a Country Church, which allows for a beautiful wedding location,  a One Room School house and an old Caboose. There are hands-on activities for children and a long list of events that are offered with the seasons. The next upcoming event is a huge Easter egg Hunt which is co-hosted by the Nacogdoches Junior Forum. It will be lots of fun for children ages 12 and under. For more information on such events, you can view their website

Here are some of the wonderful Log Cabins that are at Millard’s Crossing.

This first little log structure was built as a land office on the first county road, going East, off of hwy. 59. North of the Appleby Water Tower. Being very small, and cute might I add, it was a typical office size structure in 19th Century East Texas. It is my favorite log structure at this site and apparently, they frown upon you trying to load it into your own truck.

19tyh Century East Texas Office.

19th Century East Texas Office.

19th Century Log Office in East Texas

19th Century Log Office in East Texas

Next is Watkins Log House (1842) and was built by Mrs. Thomas’ Great Uncle on her Mother’s side of the family. It was originally located in the Watkins settlement, about 12 miles northwest of Nacogdoches, Texas. It is known as a square log house because the logs were squared off with a broad ax and adz. This helped prevent East Texas moisture from collecting in the cracks between the logs, thus preventing rot.

Watkins Log House (1842)

Watkins Log House (1842)

The below image credit goes to Texas Co-op Power and shows how pretty it is with Spring Flowers.

Watkins House (1842)

Watkins House (1842)

The Watkins Log Huse Porch

The Watkins Log House Porch

Next is The Sitton Dog Trot House ((1843)

This house was originally located about 5 miles down County Road 698 West of central Heights. It was built by William and Susan Hayter, who came to Texas in 1842. Their daughter married into the Sitton Family, and the house was donated to Millard’s Crossing by Sam Sitton, who lived on the property until his death. It is a large dog trot house with an ample sleeping loft and squared logs, which were later covered with milled lumber but removed after the house was restored.

The Sitton Dog Trot House (1843)

The Sitton Dog Trot House (1843)

The Sitton Dog Trot House (1843)

The Sitton Dog Trot House (1843)

The Sitton Dog Trot House Porch

The Sitton Dog Trot House Porch

One of the last log structures is a One Room School House. The replica structure was built to replace the original log school that was housed here until February 1999. Due to the poor condition of the original school house from the late 1800’s, the Nacogdoches Junior Forum graciously donated funds for this reconstruction. The log school reflects the practice, common with the rural areas, of utilizing existing buildings for schools which were either leased, donated, or abandoned by their owners. They were chosen for their convenient location within walking distance cross-country. (5 miles)

One Room School House

One Room School House

One Room School House

One Room School House

This is the method used to teach children syllables. Can you read it?

This is the method used to teach children syllables. Can you read it?

I’ll be. See the itty bitty ducks?

Them are not ducks!

Oh yes them are! See the itty bitty wings?

Well I’ll be, them are ducks!

P.S I have NO clue who Katilyn was!

I hope you enjoyed the tour. Stayed tuned for part two which will include the cottages, Church, Caboose and an old farmhouse.

Y'all come back now, ya hear!!

Y’all come back now, ya hear!!


P.S. Be sure to visit my follow up post, Millard’s Crossing Part Two
God Bless ~ Dawn

 

 

Comments

  1. Madonna Ferguson says

    Loved my tour. This should be submitted to a travel magazine or website. Well written and beautiful photographs.

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